You Hate Your Competitor. He’s a Hack Lawyer. He Runs a Mill. He Doesn’t Even Go Into Court. You Know You’re a Better Lawyer Than He Is, but He Seems So Much More Successful Than You. Can You Tell Your Consumers the Truth About Him?

assemblylineBefore I answer that question, you need to know my rule. It is a steadfast rule than an attorney is NEVER to violate. EVER.

Here’s the rule, which will seem like common sense…

GERRY’S UNBENDING RULE:
NEVER, EVER DISPARAGE ANYONE IN YOUR ATTORNEY VIDEO. EVER!

Here’s the harsh reality when creating great attorney video online. Your video content and the text you use to support and supplement the video stays online forever. FOREVER. (I’m shouting, in case you didn’t know.)

If you disparage an attorney because you want to expose his shenanigans as a low-life lawyer who has clerks process claims and handles the smallest soft-tissue cases there are, you will be in for a rude awakening.

If you disparage someone online, for whatever reason, you will expose yourself and your law firm to slander and libel. Guaranteed. That person or company will eventually learn about your rant and likely do two things;

File a grievance claim against you with your state’s grievance committee and
Start a lawsuit against you for libel and slander.

Next thing you know you’re defending two cases simultaneously that you could very well lose and expose yourself to significant financial penalties.

There is absolutely no rational reason for you to EVER disparage anyone on video or online. Not a competitor. Not a colleague. Not your arch enemy. Once it goes online, you can’t make it go away, even if you delete it. The damage is done and will likely only get worse.

Again, you’d think this was common sense. But it’s not.

Perfect example…

Really good trial attorney in midwest was explaining on video what great results they get for their clients. Good video content so far.

He then contrasts what he does with that “Other law firm across town that is just a mill…they don’t even try cases like we do. They’re hacks and not real lawyers.”

That wasn’t all. He named the attorney and the law firm in his video. Bad, bad move.
He took a perfectly good video and ruined it and his reputation by disparaging that sleaze-bag lawyer across town. Who knows, he might even be factually accurate in his description.

Doesn’t matter. What he did violated my hard and fast rule above. That will cost him a pretty penny. Guaranteed.

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Testimonials

I just read Gerry Oginski's book this weekend, Secrets of Lawyer Video Marketing in the Age of YouTube. You wont find better "front to back" advice on using video to market your law firm anywhere.

Ben Glass
Founder of Great Legal Marketing and a practicing personal injury trial attorney in Fairfax, VA