Why Subscribe to a YouTube Video Channel Titled New York Medical Malpractice & Personal Injury?

What could be so compelling or interesting that people from across the world would subscribe to my video channel on YouTube?

My video channel titled New York medical malpractice and personal injury is not designed for entertainment. It doesn’t fall into the comedy category either. It’s not geared for people who want to watch funny cat or dog videos. It’s got nothing to do with travel and leisure. It’s not related to TV or music.

Why then would somebody actually subscribe to a lawyer’s channel?

There are two reasons.

The first is that there are raving fans who want to see the fresh new content I put out on a regular basis.

The second  is that my colleagues or competitors want to see what I’m doing. When you subscribe to a YouTube channel, you get notified every time a new video goes up on the channel. This is a great way to see what your competitors and colleagues are doing.

DEEPER QUESTION

Now, the deeper question is why would anybody who does not have a legal problem in the state of New York want to subscribe to a lawyers’ video channel?

Think about this question: How do you advertise and market your legal services to people who do not need your services at this moment?

The answer is that there are raving fans who want to see content that I put out consistently. That might seem kind of weird to you. Who would consider themselves to be a raving fan of a lawyer’s YouTube channel, especially if they don’t have a legal problem for which they need my services?

To give you an insight into that answer, I have received many comments and e-mails from viewers who have said they found my information extremely useful and informative and they will hold onto this information should they ever need it. I receive comments from law students, professionals and business owners who have watched my videos and personally thanked me for the content I have in the videos.

WHAT CONTENT COULD POSSIBLY GENERATE THESE COMMENTS?

As you know, I’m a big advocate of not giving any legal advice in my videos. The reason is obvious. I do not want someone incorrectly relying on legal advice in a video. The other reason why I do not give legal advice on video is because the laws change and by the time someone watches that particular video the law may have changed.

SUBSCRIBE

How do you get people to subscribe to your YouTube channel?

You can always ask them, beg them or plead with them to subscribe.

The tried-and-true method of getting people to subscribe to your channel is twofold:

First, ask them.

Second, create great educational content that people want and need to know. It’s that simple.

What do you think I’m going to do now? I’m going to ask you to click here and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Why? So you can see the great content I give my viewers on a regular basis. It’s that simple. Ask and give a reason why.

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Testimonials

Gerry is an absolute master at getting you to relax and speak to the camera in such a way that the clients – the potential clients – are going to be receptive to the message that you’re giving them. I decided to use video to market my law firm because YouTube is the second largest video search website on the internet, next to Google. And at some point in time, is probably going to overtake Google. So, I think it’s absolutely critical to have content out there to appeal to potential clients in your practice area. I would go to Gerry Oginski and really learn what a master in this area would do for you. Because it is absolutely clear that Gerry’s understanding of shooting video – in particular for personal injury trial lawyers- is so far beyond anybody else in this area that you would doing yourself a real disservice if you spent your money any other way

D. J. Banovitz
D. J. Banovitz, Attorney at Law